Clinical Neurosciences Conference 2013

Treatment resistant schizophrenia (TRS) is a clinical challenge for mental health professionals, patients and families. Dr. Herbert Meltzer, Professor of Psychiatry at Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine in Evanston, Illinois, spoke about his research on this disorder at the Clinical Neurosciences 2013 conference in Vancouver on March 8, 2013. Dr. Meltzer was an investigator in the 1988 pivotal U.S. clozapine trial. He emphasized that clozapine remains the best treatment and is greatly underutilized in North America. He shared data of a 15-year follow-up of clozapine-treated patients indicating that their reduction in psychosis and functional gains persisted and in some cases continued to improve. The one domain in which the outcomes were worse was cognition as measured by the Wisconsin Card Sort test.

For TRS patients who cannot tolerate clozapine, we need more options. Dr. Meltzer has recently investigated high-dose second-generation antipsychotics such as olanzapine, risperidone, and lurasidone. In a 2008 trial of high-dose olanzapine (mean dose 34 mg daily) compared with clozapine (mean dose 564 mg daily) in TRS, he found no difference between the treatments at 6 months, although olanzapine caused more weight gain. This may seem like a long time to wait, but full clozapine response may take as long or longer.

He has also examined high-dose risperidone for TRS in the form of risperidone microsphere depot injections, 100 mg every 2 weeks, compared with a more conventional dose of 50 mg every 2 weeks for 6 months. He found no difference between the doses, which had less robust outcomes than clozapine, but he added that the serum levels of risperidone were not higher than in oral dosing. Dr. Meltzer said that were he to investigate further, he would consider testing 150 mg of risperidone microspheres every 2 weeks.

In other presentations, Dr. Ofer Agid discussed the algorithm for first-episode schizophrenia that he and his team devised at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto. Drs. Debbie Thompson and Joing Wu presented their experience and data from the Fraser Health Psychosis Treatment Optimization Program. Dr. Bill MacEwan, who organizes the annual conference, discussed findings from the Vancouver Hotel Study, and Andrea Jones described distinguishing characteristics of substance-induced psychosis in polysubstance users.

The speaker who perhaps most captivated the audience was Erin Hawkes, a woman living with schizophrenia who discussed her experience as a patient in B.C. hospitals. She has courageously spoken and written about being psychotic, refusing medication, and being restrained and injected. Although she now accepts her diagnosis and treatment, what she underwent was at times degrading and traumatizing. She reminded the audience that small acts of kindness and a gentle approach can make a difference when someone is in great distress and turmoil.

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