Evidence for accelerated aging in severe mental illness

A panel of five investigators discussed an emerging concept in psychiatry which integrates findings in epidemiology, pathophysiology  and cell biology. Dilip V. Jeste, Distinguished Professor of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the University of California at San Diego, described “inflammaging” as the low-level inflammatory tissue derangement that accompanies aging and which seems to be accelerated in people with chronic mental illness, whether major mood disorders or schizophrenia. Inflammaging can be measured by biomarkers such as C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, F2-isoprostanes, chemokines, and leukocyte telomere length. The latter, which refers to the tips of chromosomes which slowly shorten over the lifespan, is a well-recognized measure of cellular senescence.

Although psychiatrists seldom examine these biomarkers in their patients, they know that on a population basis, people with schizophrenia have a high prevalence of metabolic disorder, diabetes, and atherosclerotic vascular disease. Compared to age-matched controls, people with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder have a high rate of morbidity and mortality from these disorders, which are partially inflammatory in nature and age-related.

Dr. Jeste and his research team have studied 140 patients with schizophrenia, ages 26-65 with a mean age of 49, half women, and they confirmed the higher prevalence of metabolic and vascular disorders in this cohort. Moreover, in comparison to a group of 120 non-mentally-ill age-matched subjects, they found elevations in six inflammation-related biomarkers including CRP and the chemokine eotaxin-1. In patients and control subjects, telomere length inversely correlated with age, but only in women with schizophrenia was telomere length significantly reduced compared to controls. According to Dr. Jeste, younger women seemed most at risk for metabolic disturbances: they had the highest rates of obesity, insulin resistance, and elevated inflammatory markers. The researchers will follow the cohort longitudinally to observe what they hypothesize is an accelerated aging process.

References

Jeste DV, Wolkowitz O, Harvey P, Eyler L, Nasrallah H. Accelerated biological aging in serious mental illness: are these disorders of the whole body and not of the brain only? American Psychiatric Association Annual Meeting, San Diego, California, May 20-24, 2017.

Hong S, Lee EE, Martin AS, et al. Abnormalities in chemokine levels in schizophrenia and their clinical correlates. Schizophr Res. 2017;181:63-69. Abstract

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *