Coping With a Loved One’s Opioid Addiction: What Science Says To Do

Coping With a Loved One’s Opioid Addiction: What Science Says To Do

While many factors are blamed as contributing factors in North America’s opioid crisis and overdose, Canadian hospitals and clinics are handing out naloxone kits as a stop-gap measure for at-risk opioid users. But it can be a tricky time at any point to deal with a loved one’s addiction, whether it be to Vicodin or heroin.

What does existing science say you can do to help someone you care about? For over three decades, Maia Szalavitz, author of “Unbroken Brain: A Revolutionary New Way of Understanding Addiction,” has presented the evidence that should play a vital role when weeding through conflicting advice in a field that she states is largely unregulated. Searching out care based on scientific fact as opposed to personal and clinical experience can improve recovery chances.

Her article “What Science Says To Do If Your Loved One Has An Opioid Addiction” is an excellent, evidence-based guide derived from the best research available on addictions, including systematic reviews and clinical medication trials. Szalavitz lays out how to accurately assess the problem, delves into the psychology of addictive behavior, and suggests how to intervene gently. Then, most importantly, she explains how to choose a treatment that is research-based.

Studies suggest that most people with addiction eventually recover, a far cry from the bleak picture portrayed in the media. Recovery from an opioid addiction can look different for different people, but no doubt is rooted in two key aspects: medical assessment and a long-term maintenance program. At least, so says the World Health Organization and the Institute of Medicine, for starters. Read on for more on the science to help you help your loved one on the road to recovery.

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