Join Me at the 5th Annual Music For The Hearts Concert

Music For The Hearts Concert

Want to show support toward mental health and make a difference? Interested in a night of live performances and food?

Join me for the 5th Annual Music For The Hearts (MFTH) charity event on Saturday, September 15th. It will be a night of celebrations, with music, great talent, and health advocacy, at the Evergreen Cultural Centre.

MFTH is a non-profit charity dedicated to supporting various causes that benefit health care in Metro Vancouver. They are made up of a group of university students, who have combined their interest in music with their passion for health. Their mission is to organize annual fundraising musical concerts to implement positive changes for our community.

This year, MFTH’s committee members unanimously decided to further contribute to mental health, specifically severe mental illness. All funds raised from ticket sales and further contributions will be donated to BC Schizophrenia Society (BCSS) in order to help families in need.

Schizophrenia is a form of severe mental illness that, for most, is a life-long, debilitating disease. Despite its complexity, it is still manageable. However, the costs associated with seeking treatment and other means of aid are quite expensive. By collaborating with BCSS, all their donations will be used to directly support those coping with schizophrenia, educate the public, and contribute to research and awareness for better medical services.

Don’t miss out on an event that supports an important cause close to my heart!

Buy your tickets today for $15.

Riverview Refractory Psychosis Data Presented at International Psychiatry Congress

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View the poster in a PDF file here

Abstract

Treatment-resistant psychosis is a challenge to psychiatry and a substantial burden to health-care systems. The province of British Columbia in Canada has publicly funded, universal health care, and patients with treatment-resistant psychosis may receive care in a specialized residential program. Between 1993 and 2011, 663 patients were admitted to this program; this cohort contains one of the largest known series of patients with treatment-resistant schizoaffective disorder.

All patients were evaluated by a psychiatrist, social worker, pharmacist, nurse, general physician, and neuropsychologist. Records from previous hospital admissions were reviewed and all information was presented at a multidisciplinary conference. This resulted in a consensus DSM-III or -IV multiaxial diagnosis and a detailed treatment plan. Ratings of symptoms and functioning at admission and discharge included the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale, the Social and Occupational Functioning Scale, and the Clinical Global Impression of Severity. A research psychologist compiled all data at the time of each patient’s hospitalization.

Patients who did not complete treatment or had a diagnosis other than schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective (SZA) or mood disorder (MD) were excluded; the following describes 551 included patients (SZ = 63%, SZA = 29%, MD = 8%). More than half were male (59%), and the mean duration of hospitalization was 30 weeks. The proportion receiving clozapine increased from 21% at admission to 61% at discharge. Those with a MD were less likely to receive clozapine than either SZ or SZA (SZ = 64%, SZA = 61%, MD = 41%). In each diagnostic group, both antipsychotic polypharmacy and the ratio of prescribed daily dose to defined daily dose (PDD/DDD) of antipsychotic medication decreased during hospital stay (polypharmacy: SZ: 52% to 16%, SZA: 52% to 14%, MD: 43% to 0%; PDD/DDD: SZ: 2.1 to 1.6, SZA: 2.1 to 1.4, MD: 1.6 to 1.1). The use of mood stabilizers declined in all groups, but antidepressant use declined only in SZ and SZA. Mean total PANSS score declined in all diagnostic groups, but most in MD, least in SZ, and intermediate in SZA.

In an intensive inpatient program for treatment-resistant psychosis, aggregate improvement occurred despite global reduction in medications while clozapine use nearly tripled. Lower total antipsychotic dose correlated with greater improvement at discharge.