Exercise-associated hippocampal plasticity and hippocampal microvascular plasticity in chronic refractory schizophrenia patients

RANDALL - WIN_20150331_130356Donna Jane-Mai Lang, Alexander Rauscher, Allen E Thornton, Kristina Gicas Geoff Smith, Vina Goghari, Olga Leonova, Randall F White, Fidel Vila-Rodriguez, Wayne Su, Barbara Humphries, Aaron Phillips, William Honer, Alexandra Talia Vertinsky, Darren E Warburton. Poster presented at 15th International Congress on Schizophrenia Research, Colorado Springs, Colorado. March 29-April 1, 2015.

Abstract

Background: Hippocampal deficits are a commonly reported finding in chronic schizophrenia patients, and may contribute to severity of illness. Regular exercise is thought to remediate both hippocampal volume reductions and neurovascular flow to this region.

Methods: Seventeen chronic refractory schizophrenia patients were enrolled in a 12-week exercise intervention trial. Clinical assessments (PANSS, SOFAS, Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAMAS), Calgary Depression Scale, Extrapyramidal Symptom Severity Scale), physical assessments (BMI, resting heart rate (RHR), blood pressure (BP), VO2 Max) and 3T MRI data (3D structural MRI, susceptibility weighted imaging) were ascertained at baseline and 12 weeks. Repeated measures ANOVAs with total (L+R) hippocampal and total hippocampal venule volumes expressed as ratios to total brain volume and total hippocampal volume respectively. Additional correlational models were applied.

Results: Patients had a significant increase in total hippocampal volume after 12 weeks of exercise (F(1, 33) = 6.8, p. = 0.019. Total hippocampal venule volume was not significantly increased after exercise (F(1, 33) = 0.17), although the overall increase in venule volume was 7-7.5%. A significant positive relationship between absolute change in total hippocampal volume and absolute change in hippocampal venule volume was observed (r = .52, p. = 0.04). Patients exhibited reduced symptom severity (p. = 0.0005), improved social and occupational functioning (p. = 0.0004), and a strong trend for reduced depression severity (p. = 0.06) at the end of the 12-week exercise intervention. Measures of BMI, RHR, BP and VO2 Max were not statistically different at 12 weeks, however exploratory investigations revealed a potential, but statistically nonsignificant relationship between improved VO2 Max capacity and reduced HAMAS score (r = -.44, p. = .067).

Conclusion: We observed exercise-associated hippocampal volume increases after 12 weeks of regular exercise in chronic refractory schizophrenia patients, as was previously reported by Pajonk et al, 2010. Moreover, these changes in hippocampal volume were correlated to changes in hippocampal venule volumes. These data support the hypothesis that regular exercise offers remediation in both hippocampal tissue volume and hippocampal microvascular volume in chronically treated refractory patients. Relationships to other clinical measures still remain to be clearly established.

Dimenhydrinate (Gravol) abuse worsens schizophrenia

We just published a report in the Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology of a woman who abused dimenhydrinate for years. Only after she had sustained abstinence from this over-the-counter remedy for nausea did her psychosis respond well to treatment. Read the case report.

Dr. Vila receives award at American Psychiatric Association 2014 meeting

Dr. Fidel Vila-Rodriguez, a BC Psychosis Program psychiatrist, received an American Psychiatric Foundation Early Academic Career Award on Schizophrenia Research at the APA Annual Meeting in New York in May, 2014. To learn about Dr. Vila’s research, visit his lab Web site NINET.CA.

Fidel Vila-Rodriguez Joins BC Psychosis Program

FVR_BCPP

Fidel Vila-Rodriguez, MD recently joined the BC Psychosis Program as a staff psychiatrist. Dr. Vila received his medical degree in 2000 at the University Autonoma of Barcelona in Barcelona, Spain and completed a residency in psychiatry at San Joan de Deu Mental Health Services. After graduation, he was an attending psychiatrist at El Prat Mental Health Team as well as a clinical research fellow in schizophrenia. Dr. Vila received his Master of Advance Studies in Neuroscience in 2007 at the University of Barcelona. After coming to Canada in 2006 and graduating from the UBC Psychiatry residency program, Dr. Vila has been practicing in the area of neurostimulation at Vancouver General Hospital and Saint Paul’s Hospital.

Dr. Vila is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at UBC, and his research interests include understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of and treatment for psychosis and mood disorders. He has extensively published in international peer-reviewed journals and has received many awards for his work including the Tsung-Yi Li Award for Clinical Research, the George Davidson Scholarship Award, and the significant Contribution to Research Award.

Another passion of Dr. Vila’s is soccer. He volunteers as a board member for the Vancouver Street Soccer League, an organization that strives to improve the lives of people with mental illness, addiction, and homelessness through team sports.