American Psychiatric Association 2017 Annual Meeting

American Psychiatric Association 2017

Dr Randall White was presenting a research poster at the American Psychiatric Association 2017 Annual Meeting in San Diego, CA.

Session: New Research Posters 1
Date: Monday, May 22
Time: 10:00 AM–12:00 PM
Poster Number: P5-020
Poster Hall: Exhibit Hall A, Ground Level, San Diego Convention Center

Dr White discussing the BCPP findings with Dr. John Kane, who did the first controlled trial of clozapine in North America.

ABSTRACT

Although clozapine is the standard for treatment-resistant psychosis, 40-60% of those treated with clozapine do not have an adequate response as measured by a 20% or greater reduction in the BPRS, PANSS or other assessments. This condition is known as clozapine resistance, ultra-resistance or refractory psychosis. At the publicly funded BC Psychosis Program, at UBC Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, we have developed criteria to identify clozapine resistance (CR) and an algorithmic approach to treatment based on available evidence. This involves assuring adequate clozapine treatment verified by dose and serum level, including addition of fluvoxamine when appropriate; offering ECT to CR patients, and/or antipsychotic augmentation preferably with sulpiride or aripiprazole. All patients admitted since program inception in February 2012 had failed at least 2 antipsychotic trials. A psychiatrist, social worker, pharmacist, nurse, general physician, and neuropsychologist evaluated each patient. All available summaries of previous psychiatric admissions were reviewed, and medical, pharmacological, social and behavioural histories were recorded.

All information is presented at a case conference and a DSM-IV or -5 multiaxial diagnosis reflects agreement among at least 2 psychiatrists and a psychologist. Symptom ratings included the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Global Assessment of Psychopathology (GAPS), and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity and Improvement scales (CGI). Clozapine resistance is defined by an adequate trial, that is, at least 500 mg daily dose for ≥60 days; and continued symptoms manifested by PANSS with 2 positive scale items rated ≥ 4 (moderate) OR 1 item ≥ 6 (severe).

Of 114 patients with schizoaffective disorder or schizophrenia on clozapine at admission, 89 had received it for≥ 60 days; 23 were on at least 500 mg; and 20 met criteria for clozapine resistance (i.e., 17 men and 3 women). Of these, 17 had schizophrenia and 3 schizoaffective disorder; the mean age was 39.6 years. The mean PANSS scores at admission were Positive=28.3, Negative=26.2, General=50.0, Total=104.4; the mean CGI-S was 6.3. Of 16 patients with complete data, 8 were offered ECT and 3 accepted a course; the number of ECT treatments ranged 19-46. Of 19 patients discharged to date, 17 remained on clozapine with a mean dose of 463.2 mg; to obtain a therapeutic clozapine level, 6 received fluvoxamine, dose range 37.5-200 mg. Seven patients received adjunctive antipsychotics: 3 sulpiride, 2 aripiprazole, 4 first-generation agents. At discharge, the mean PANSS were Positive=20.8, Negative=22.1, General=40.0, Total=82.9; the mean CGI-S was 5.1.

Find full info on the American Psychiatric Association 2017 Annual Meeting here! 

Topirimate as augmentation for antipsychotic treatment

With modulating dopamine as the primary pharmacotherapeutic option to treat schizophrenia, we are left unable to adequately treat at least 30% of our patients, Dr. Christoph Correll told the audience at the 2016 Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference in Vancouver. The evidence for combining dopamine antagonists, whether first- or second-generation antipsychotics, is not favorable according to a meta-analysis he described which is in review for publication. When only high-quality studies were included, which involved 14 trials with 938 subjects, the evidence for combining antipsychotics melted to nothing. Although it makes sense that using two medications with the essentially the same mechanism of action would not be synergistic, many practitioners nevertheless do just that.

Dr. Christoph Correll at the 2016 Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference

Dr. Christoph Correll at the 2016 Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference

Dr. Correll, who is Professor of Psychiatry at Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine and Medical Director of the Recognition and Prevention Program at the Zucker Hillside Hospital in Queens, New York, said that adding agents with a different mechanism of action may be more promising. Topirimate acts to inhibit activity in the glutamate-NMDA receptor complex and is approved as an anticonvulsant. It also counters the weight gain of psychotropic medications by reducing appetite and enhancing insulin sensitivity. He and six coauthors have recently published a meta-analysis of 16 randomized, controlled trials including a total of 934 patients who received topirimate adjunctive to antipsychotic therapy; outcome data included PANSS or BPRS total scores and body weight, and secondary outcomes included positive and negative symptoms and various metabolic measures including waist circumference and serum glucose.

The benefit for augmentation was significant as measured by total PANSS or BPRS for the entire group, and sensitivity analyses showed it held true with a dose of 150 mg per day or less, in first and multi-episode patients, and either with clozapine or non-clozapine antipsychotics. The effect was independently significant for positive and for negative symptoms. Topirimate was associated with a significant reduction in weight with a mean reduction of 2.75 kg; other metabolic measures were unchanged except for significant reduction in serum triglycerides and fasting insulin. Although discontinuation for adverse effects or inefficacy did not differ with topirimate or placebo, notable adverse effects of topirimate included concentration problems and paresthesias.

These studies were all short-term with a mean duration of 11.8 weeks, a problem with many clinical trials in psychiatry  given that schizophrenia is a chronic disorder and patients remain on  medication for months to years. Cognitive problems including word-finding difficulty are a known effect of topirimate, and in an illness in which cognitive impairment is inherent, this could be a major liability. Longer-term effects on cognition, metabolic outcomes and psychosis are needed. Will topirimate be the NMDA-modulating treatment that makes a difference or end up like lamotrigine, abandoned after a brief dalliance?

Reference

Zheng W, Xiang Y-T, Xiang Y-Q, Li X-B, Ungvari GS, Chiu HFK, Correll CU. Efficacy and safety of adjunctive topiramate for schizophrenia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Acta Psychiatr Scand. 2016:1–14. Published online 1 Sep 2016. Abstract

Schizophrenia is not a progressive brain disease

DSC_0072 1 (2)Despite Emil Kraepelin’s early characterization of dementia praecox, the disorder or disorders that we now call schizophrenia are not characterized by dementia, or inevitable loss of cognitive ability and function. Dr. Robert B. Zipursky, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario, said that psychiatrists may share Kraepelin’s impression of a malignant illness because of the clinician’s illusion, which arises from the biased sample of patients that psychiatrists treat, i.e. people with chronic, relapsing illness and multiple co-morbidities who come to hospitals (1). According to Professor Zipursky, who spoke at the 9th Annual Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference in Coquitlam, BC on September 18, 2015, available studies indicate that about 70% of people with first-episode psychosis will achieve remission within a year; he defined remission as having positive symptoms no greater that mild in severity and negative symptoms no greater than moderate in severity.

First-episode psychosis includes patients with various diagnoses including bipolar disorder, schizoaffective disorder, brief psychotic disorder as well as schizophrenia. Patients who achieve functional recovery, however, represent a smaller group, especially in those confirmed to have schizophrenia. In long-term outcome research, 20% or fewer of people with schizophrenia meet criteria for recovery defined as sustained remission of symptoms and success in social relations and competitive employment.
Some psychiatrists have concluded that this long-term functional impairment is due to progressive cognitive deterioration which may occur with untreated or chronic positive psychotic symptoms. A related hypothesis is the “neurotoxicity of psychosis” which posits that persisting psychosis leads to ongoing loss of cerebral tissue as manifested by enlarged ventricles and cortical atrophy on neuroimaging, accompanied by worsening deficits on neuropsychologic testing. Consequently, many clinicians working in first episode psychosis accept that the duration of untreated psychosis is an important determinant of long-term outcome.

While he acknowledged that deficits in grey matter volumes observed with MRI are more prominent in chronic patients, Dr. Zipursky asserted that many factors may contribute to this such as sampling bias; concurrent substance use including cannabis, tobacco and alcohol; lack of physical activity; and chronic antipsychotic therapy. The latter is controversial, but he cited a meta-analysis of longitudinal MRI studies in which change in grey matter volumes was correlated with antipsychotic exposure but not illness duration or severity (2). However, he emphasized that relieving suffering and improving function are the goals of treatment, not specifically increasing cerebral volume, which is affected by various factors mentioned before. Furthermore, Dr. Zipursky showed compelling evidence that following a first episode of schizophrenia, antipsychotic discontinuation is by far the most important cause of relapse.

Duration of untreated psychosis (DUP) has a small correlation with treatment outcome, likely accounting for less than 5% of the variance in clinical outcome measures, and questionable association with cognitive functioning and structural brain measures, according to Dr. Zipursky. He presented evidence that it is a risk marker for poor outcome in schizophrenia as opposed to a causative risk factor. “It’s not certain that it relates to improving outcomes, but it does relate to reducing suffering,” Zipursky said.
He concluded that to improve outcomes and promote functional recovery, antipsychotic medication is crucial but so are psychosocial interventions to manage substance use, educate families, provide adequate housing and income support when needed, and engage patients in vocational rehabilitation and supported employment.

References

Zipursky RB, Reilly TJ, Murray RM. The myth of schizophrenia as a progressive brain disease. Schizophr Bull. 2013;39:1363-1372. Full text

Fusar-Poli P, Smieskova R, Kempton MJ, Ho BC, Andreasen NC, Borgwardt S. Progressive brain changes in schizophrenia related to antipsychotic treatment? A meta-analysis of longitudinal MRI studies. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2013;37:1680-1691. Full text

The skeptical UK view of second-generation antipsychotics

Professor Tim Kendall, director of the National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health in the United Kingdom, gave a plenary lecture on “The Rise and Fall of the Atypical Antipsychotics” at the 7th Annual Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference on 20 September 2013, in Coquitlam, BC. According to Dr. Kendall, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), for which the National Collaborating Centre provides expertise in its psychiatric guideline development, concluded in a 2002 appraisal that the atypical antipsychotics might have greater efficacy and fewer adverse effects than typical antipsychotics. In 2009, NICE issued an updated guideline for schizophrenia treatment based on new evidence and multiple pairwise meta-analyses and found that the atypical or second-generation antipsychotics do not constitute a special class. In his view, the distinction is merely a marketing tool.

In selecting a medication, Dr. Kendall said we should ask our patients, “Would you rather be fat or stiff?” because the decision often comes down to whether patients can better tolerate extrapyramidal or metabolic adverse effects. An exception is clozapine, which falls into the “fat” category but remains the choice for treatment resistance; otherwise NICE does not recommend any specific antipsychotic over another.

A simultaneous economic analysis of antipsychotic treatment also produced provocative findings. Although the price of antipsychotic medications can vary widely, the model found no significant difference in cost effectiveness among the seven antipsychotics included in the analysis (amisulpride, aripiprazole, haloperidol, olanzapine, paliperidone, risperidone, zotepine). The driver of cost is relapse and hospitalization; drug-acquisition cost plays a minor role in the overall expense of a patient’s care. The lesson is that whatever medication a given patient is willing to take and can tolerate may improve adherence, reduce relapse, and save the immense price of inpatient treatment.