12th Annual Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference

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Dr. Randall White will be co-chairing the 12th Annual Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference which will will take place on September 21st, 2018 at the Pinnacle Hotel Harbourfront, Vancouver. This popular annual conference features a wide range of topics presented by renowned speakers, with a focus on pharmacological interventions for people with mental health problems.

Key Speakers at the 12th Annual Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference

One of the keynote speakers will be Dr. Don Goff., an expert on schizophrenia from New York University.

12th Annual Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference Dr. Jon Goff

Some of Dr. Goff’s recent publications include:
1) “The Genetics of Endophenotypes of Neurofunction to Understand Schizophrenia (GENUS) consortium: A collaborative cognitive and neuroimaging genetics project.” Read it here.

2) “Association between catechol-O-methyltransferase genetic variation and functional connectivity in patients with first-episode schizophrenia.” Read it here.

3) “Association of Hippocampal Atrophy With Duration of Untreated Psychosis and Molecular Biomarkers During Initial Antipsychotic Treatment of First-Episode Psychosis.” Read it here.

Another highlight of the event will feature Dr. Lakshmi Yatham, the Regional Head of Psychiatry and Regional Program Medical Director for Vancouver Coastal Health and Providence Healthcare. He is also a Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of British Columbia.

12th Annual Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference Dr. Lakshmi Yatham

Dr. Lakshmi Yatham’s presentation will cover the CANMAT & ISBD Guidelines for the Management of Bipolar Disorder. Read and learn more about the recent publication of the CANMAT bipolar disorder treatment guidelines here.

Join Dr. Randall White and many other experts this September for the 12th Annual Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference, and register today! 

The overdose crisis in British Columbia

Dr. Arlene King of Fraser Health Authority and former chief medical officer of health of Ontario gave an update on the evolving overdose epidemic in Fraser Health region, which covers communities from White Rock to Hope, British Columbia.  On September 21, the chief coroner of BC had announced 488 overdose deaths to date in BC, a 62% increase compared to the same time in 2015. According to Dr. King, who gave a plenary presentation on September 23 at the 2016 Pacific Psychopharmacology Conference in Vancouver, more than 60% of deaths in Fraser region were related to fentanyl, and if the current trend continues through 2016, 258 people will have died of overdose in the region. Although most people who die of overdose have a chronic substance-use disorder, young, naïve users are at high risk because of the presence of fentanyl in a wide variety of substances sold in the black market in BC. Fentanyl is a potent legal opioid, but the street form is mostly imported from clandestine markets in Asia. Fraser Health Authority is undertaking a variety of measures to prevent lethal drug overdoses; more information is available on Fraserhealth.ca .

On the previous day, Dr. Annabelle Mead, lead physician for Heartwood Centre for Women and an addiction medicine consultant for Vancouver Coastal Health, described the evidence for providing take-home naloxone kits and overdose education to prevent deaths. Naloxone kits are available in communities across BC, and specific outlets are posted on the Web site Toward the Heart which is maintained by the BC Centre for Disease Prevention. The site offers information about a variety of harm reduction approaches including a link to Insite, North America’s first legal safe-injection site in the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver. In other Canadian cities, efforts are underway to open safe-injection sites, which have strong evidence for preventing disease transmission and fatal overdoses, but no site has yet been announced in the Fraser region.

Drs. Ric Procyshyn, Christoph Correll, and Bill MacEwan visit the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver

Drs. Ric Procyshyn, Christoph Correll, and Bill MacEwan visit the Downtown Eastside of Vancouver

Join Dr. Randall White at the 11th Annual Family Conference: From Crisis to Hope

11th family conference poster 2016

Dr. Randall White is pleased to be presenting at the 11th Annual Family Conference in mental healthy and substance services. Please join us Saturday, April 23, 2015, 9:00am-4:30pm in the Paetzold Theatre at the Vancouver General Hospital. Admission is $25 per person, and limited financial assistant for admission cost is available –just contact Becky Hynes via email (or call 604-714-3771 ext. 2300 for details.

Keynote Presentations Include:

  • Access & Assessment Centre (AAC): A New Service for Vancouver Residents to Access Mental Health and Substance Use Services in Vancouver
    • Monica McAlduff (Director, Vancouver Mental Health & Substance Use Acute, Tertiary & Urgent Services)
    • George Scotton (Manager, Vancouver Access & Assessment Centre, ACT & AOT)
  • Finding Clarity in Chaos: Principles for Developing Health and Recovery
    • Dr. Diane Fredrikson (Physician Lead, Early Psychosis Intervention Program, Vancouver Coastal Health)
  • When Treatments are Inadequate – New Hope for Patients
    • Dr. Randall F. White (Medical Director, B.C. Psychosis Program, Clinical Associate Professor, UBC)

Panel Discussions:

  • Support for Families in Need
  • Family Panel: How Families Can Advocate for Improved Mental Health Care

For the complete program schedule, click here!

Have questions about 11th Annual Family Conference in Mental Health and Substance Use Services? Contact Annual Family Conference: Family Involvement in Mental Health and Substance Use Services

11th family conference poster 2016

 

 


 

Meet Miriam Cohen, new access coordinator

Miriam Cohen has recently joined the BC Psychosis Program as our access and discharge coordinator. Miriam has extensive experience in mental health nursing, and she previously worked at UBC hospital as the coordinator for the Early Psychosis Intervention Program from 2000 until 2003 and continued in that role when the program moved to the community. More recently, she was the program director for child and adolescent psychiatry at BC Children’s Hospital, and she received the Oustanding Nurse Award from BC Mental Health and Addictions Services in 2008.

Miriam received her training at York University and Seneca College in Ontario, and completed her Bachelor of Science in Nursing at UBC in 1996. We are pleased to have her join our team; she already has ideas about improving the referral and admissions process.

Dr. Leona Adams joins BCPP

Dr. Leona Adams joined the BC Psychosis Program in December. In addition to her role as a psychiatrist with the BCPP, she will continue on staff at St. Paul’s Hospital where she works on an acute inpatient unit, and where she has been involved in collaborative care in the infectious disease clinic.

Dr. Adams obtained her medical degree in 2002 at the University of British Columbia Faculty of Medicine and completed her psychiatry residency at Dalhousie University in Halifax. She is a fellow of the Royal College of Physicians of Canada and a Clinical Instructor in Psychiatry at UBC. In addition to her various activities as a physician, she is a member of the Good Noise Vancouver Gospel Choir. I have attended a number of their concerts and recommend it highly!

Welcome!

The B.C. Psychosis Program at Detwiller Pavilion, UBC hospital, admitted its first patients on Feb 23, 2012. As heir to the Refractory Psychosis ward at Riverview Hospital, the program accepted nine patients from Riverview who were not yet ready to go home. Since then, patients have been admitted from Fraser Health, Vancouver Coastal Health, and Vancouver Island. We have space for patients from Interior and Northern Health Authorities and look forward to referrals from those regions. We have a presence on the Web and our referral forms are available for download.

Many people played a role in organizing the program and helping in the transition from Riverview to UBC Hospital. I was selected to be medical director in December 2011 well after this process was underway. I have not even met some of the people who were instrumental in making the program come together in February with the infrastructure and personnel we need to function. Although I risk offense by leaving some important names out, I want to thank certain people for helping me as I took on this job. They include Bill MacEwan whose counsel has been invaluable, Carole Rudko and Derek Lyons for all the work they’ve done in hiring and training our staff, and Leslie Arnold whose vision and personal interest in this project have made it possible. Sean Flynn, Diane Fredrikson and Veerle Willaeys are physician colleagues who are working to make our clinical program excellent. Bill Honer, Laura Case and Soma Ganesan have provided vital advice and support to me and our team. The steering committee, which includes people from all Health Authorities, continues to meet monthly and is our conduit to the province.

Creating a provincial resource in the ivory tower of UBC is a challenge given the distance to places like Campbell River, Terrace and every other town in B.C. where people and families are affected by severe psychosis. The B.C. Psychosis Program needs to be accessible to them just as it is to people in Vancouver. But the benefit of being at UBC is the ability to attract excellent staff and to create a site for significant research on treatment-resistant psychosis.